Women today hold 19% of congressional seats and are  20% of U.S. Senators

Research before you vote.


The 19th Amendment gave women the right to vote. Use it. With mid-term elections next month/ the presidential election next year, do your research so you are informed where candidates stand on important issues to you.

Support nonprofits that help girls and women.

Volunteer or donate to nonprofits that work on improving the lives of women and girls. Take part in female organizations that make a difference in their communities.


Looking to get involved in your community? Junior Auxiliary represents a serious endeavor on the part of women to be active and constructive community participants and to assume leadership roles in meeting community needs. With a focus on principles of helping children and making a difference in their lives, junior Auxiliary provides the member with the opportunity to serve and to be a vital part of the community. 

Contact your local chapter to find out how to get involved! 

Interested in starting a chapter in your area? 

In Your Home.

For Women. 

In Your Office.

In Your Community.

67% of women rate mentorship as highly important in helping to advance and grow their careers, yet  63% of women never has had a formal mentor.

Create a culture of support. 


Encourage female veteran employees to go have coffee or lunch with a junior staff member.  Invite new hires to shadow senior employees on projects and in committees. Having female mentors is especially important to young women as they navigate the unique challenges of becoming a successful, thriving woman in both their professional and personal lives.

Starting in childhood girls are inundated with negative messages and behaviors that prevent them building healthy relationships and ideals about their potential.

Be her role model.


The family is the first place a girl develops her sense of self, who she is and who she wants to become. Parents that are informed can create an environment that encourages and supports her in achieving her full potential.  

Support her in discovering her talents and encourage her interests. Interest, not just expertise, should be motivation enough.  

Say something nice.

Monitor your comments about yourself, your daughter and other women. Show her how to build others up, not tear them down.  

Avoid negative terms.

Why is a girl bossy, but a boy is ambitious? Shouldn’t a girl throw like a girl?  Avoid words and terms that stereotype girls and woman as less than a male.